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December 2006 issue

Contents
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Special Report
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Executive courses in Germany

Germany's reputation for international business has meant a longstanding history of specialist executive language training programmes in the country. One new development is the blending of language training and relaxation activities.

Many language schools in Germany offer a targeted language training course tailored specifically for the needs of business people and they report that demand for such courses has always been high. “Our school has existed since 1897,” says Isabel Hagl from inlingua Sprachschule in Munich. “We have offered executive courses since then. We have big demand for this type of course.”

Florian Meierhofer from BWS Germanlingua in Berlin and Munich points out that this sector of the language teaching market has always been an important one for German language schools. “To do business in Germany, with Germans or within a German company is one of the main reasons why someone wants to learn German,” he says. “Economically, Germany is very important in Europe and more and more also in the whole world, which makes German also very important in the language market.”

While Germany as a country occupies an important place in the world of business, certain cities naturally attract business people, Martin Spitta from Eloquia in Frankfurt explains. “Frankfurt is the financial heart of Germany. With approximately 400 banks, there is a strong demand for high quality tailored courses [here],” he says.

Many schools have become increasingly specialised in executive needs and design specialised courses according to the demands of relevant companies. Meierhofer believes that “time is more and more a big issue for companies”. He continues, “It is too expensive for the companies to put executives in regular group classes, as the companies lose too much working time. Even if executive courses are more expensive for the companies, the quicker learning effect pays off.”

While most schools exhibit a flexible approach when it comes to course content, some are working to develop the delivery of courses in order to meet demand. “We are open to any new courses,” says Rainauld Laurer from DaF Deutschkurse fur Auslandische in Munich. “This depends on the needs of our students. Maybe [we will introduce] more blended learning in the future. Maybe an integration of cultural or entertainment aspects [in the programme].”

With time usually a top priority for executive clients, most schools provide intensive or one-to-one business course options. Carl Duisberg Centrum, which has centres in Berlin, Cologne, Dortmund, Munich and Radolfzell, has two types of executive courses for “middle and high rank executives”, according to Hans-Georg Albers. The first is a crash course combining a group language course in the morning with either five or 10 lessons of individual tuition in the afternoon, while the second provides 40 hours of intensive one-to-one tuition with one or two teachers per week. “Both these course types are very successful and have been booked in several Carl Duisberg centres,” relates Albers.

Almir Krupic from did deutsch-institut in Berlin, Frankfurt and Munich says that business executives from around the world are attracted to their training courses “on account of our high reputation”. The school has links with national and international companies in all three cities, which means that students can undergo internship placements and forge real business links while learning the language. However, a new development at the school is the amalgamation of intensive language training with relaxation activities. “We are currently working on the development of a combination of executive [training] plus spa and recovery,” says Krupic.

Contact any advertiser in the this issue now

The following language schools, associations and accommodation providers advertised in the latest edition of Language Travel Magazine. If you would like more information on any of these advertisers, tick the relevant boxes, fill out your details and send.

Name

Company
Country

Telephone

Email


ASSOCIATIONS/
GROUPS
Belta
English Australia
Fedele
Ialc
MEI-Relsa
Quality English

STUDENT WEBSITES
language-
       programs.net

TOURIST BOARDS
Fedele/Turlingua
Malta Tourism
       Authority

WORK EXPERIENCE/
INTERNSHIPS
Access
       International
Anglolang Academy
       of English
Aspect
Auckland English
       Academy
Cambridge Academy
       of English
Cape Studies -
       Pacific Gateway
       Study Group
Churchill House
Cork English College
Eastbourne School
       of English
Eckersley School of
       English
Excel English
Frances King
Kaplan Educational
       Centers
Lake School of
       English
Languages
       International
Malvern House
Modus Language
       Institute
Monash University
Prolog- International
       House Berlin
Rotorua English
       Language Academy
Tellus Group / Work
       Experience UK
University of
       California San Diego
Vancouver English
       Centre

WORKSHOPS/EXPOS
Belta
English Australia
IALC
MEI-Relsa

AUSTRALIA
English Australia
Monash University

CANADA
Access International
Immersion Baie-des-
       Chaleurs
Modus Language
       Institute
Vancouver English
       Centre

CHINA
Mandarin House

ENGLAND
Anglolang Academy
       of English
Aspect (Australia,
       Canada, England,
       France, Germany,
       Ireland, Malta,
       New Zealand,
       Scotland, South
       Africa, Spain, USA)
Beet Language
       Centre
Bell International
       (Malta, UK)
Cambridge Academy
       of English
Churchill House
Cicero Languages
       Int.
Eastbourne School
       of English
Eckersley School of
       English
English Language
       Centre Brighton
       & Hove
Excel English
       Language School
Frances King School
       of English
Ialc
Lake School of
       English
LAL Language and
       Leisure
       (England, Malta,
       South Africa, USA)
London School of
       English
Malvern House
Millfield Enterprises
Quality English
Queen Ethelburga's
       College
Study Group
       (Australia, Canada,
       England, France,
       Germany, Ireland,
       Italy, New Zealand,
       South Africa,
       Spain, USA)
Tellus Group
West London
       Business College
Wimbledon School
       of English

GERMANY
Prolog- International
       House Berlin

IRELAND
Cork English College
       /Language &
       Activity Holidays
Galway Cultural
       Institute
Linguaviva Centre
MEI-Relsa

MALTA
Malta Tourism
       Authority

NEW ZEALAND
Auckland English
       Academy
Languages
       International
Rotorua English
       Language Academy

POLAND
York School

RUSSIA
Liden & Denz
       Language Centre

SCOTLAND
Stirling University

SOUTH AFRICA
Cape Studies -
       Pacific Gateway
       Study Group
Good Hope Studies
Interlink School of
       Languages

SPAIN
Fedele/Turlingua

SWITZERLAND
EF Language
       Colleges Ltd

USA
American Language
       Communication
       Center
Brown University
California State
       University Fullerton
ELS Language
       Centers
Kaplan Educational
       Centers (Canada,
       England, USA)
Monterey Institute of
       International
       Studies
University of
       California Riverside
University of
       California San Diego
University of
       California Santa
       Cruz
Zoni Language
       Centers