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May 2010 issue

Contents
News
Agency News
Agency Survey
Feedback
Market Report
Direction

Special Report
Course Guide
Spotlight
Destination
Regional Focus
Status

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Turkey uncertain


Business was not as buoyant for Turkish agencies this year, with average business growth at an all-time low. Meanwhile, students were more likely to be choosing language programmes than other overseas study packages this year.

Key points
• The total number of students placed by the 17 agencies in our survey was 3,588

• Individual agencies placed between 11 and 750 students on courses per year

• Average business growth was 0.75 per cent in the last 12 months

• The average length of stay for Turkish students was 11.5 weeks

• Overall, 63 per cent of Turkish students stayed in host families when studying overseas

Two of the agencies surveyed charged their clients a handling fee of between US$100 and US$150

In the last 12 months, agencies worked with an average of 39 different providers


Top destinations Most popular courses
1. UK 50%
2. USA 22%
3. Canada 9.5%
4. Malta 5%
5. Australia 4.5%
6. Spain 2.5%
7. France 2%
8. Germany 1.5%
Other 3%
1. General 41%
2. Intensive 17%
3. Academic prep. 16%
4. Junior 11%
5
. Business 8%
6. Lang. & work exp. 4%
7. Summer vacation 2%
Other 1%

Reasons for language travel Average percentage agency business
1. Future work 61%
2. Current work 16%
3. Studies overseas 14%
4. Studies at home 5%
5. Pleasure 4%
1. Language progr. 73%
2. Higher education 7%
3. Work & travel 6%
4. Volunteer 2%
5. Internships 1%
Other 6%

How do agencies recruit students?
How do agencies find new business partners?
1. Word-of-mouth 50%
2. Website 22%
3. E/online 14%
4. Seminars to students 6%
5. Advert in press 4%
6. Mail shots 3%
Other 1%
1. Workshops 25%
2. Internet 24%
2. Fairs and expos 24%
4. LTM/ETM 16%
Other 11%

Percentage of agents who recognised each of the following organisations
Australia
Acpet 53%
English Australia 65%

Canada
Languages Canada 65%

France
Souffle 41%
FLE.fr 0%
L'Office 12%
Unosel 0%

Ireland
MEI 24%

Italy
Asils 12%
Italian in Italy 12%

Malta
Feltom 71%

New Zealand
English NZ 35%
Portugal
Aeple 0%

South Africa
EduSa 12%

Spain
Fedele 29%

UK
ABLS 12%
English UK 88%
British Council 88%

USA
AAIEP 76%
Accet 76%
CEA 29%
UCIEP 35%

International
Eaquals 47%
Ialc 35%
IHWO 41%
Quality English 76%
Tandem 24%



Market growth
On average, Turkish agents posted a marginal business growth of just 0.75 per cent for the last 12 months. This is a considerable decrease on 2009’s results, when overall growth was 26 per cent across the 10 agencies that took part (see LTM, March 2009, pages 24-25). This year, five out of the 17 agencies experienced a decline in business of between 15 and 25 per cent, while six agencies had seen their business grow by between 25 and 70 per cent and a further five had seen business stagnate. Very few agencies gave a reason for whether their business had grown or not over the last 12 months, although some pointed to the global economic crisis and swine flu as having a detrimental effect.

Language and destination trends
Turkish students overwhelmingly want to study English in the UK, according to the results of our survey this year, with 85 per cent of clients choosing English language programmes and 50 per cent wanting to study in the UK – down slightly on the 55 per cent figure recorded in 2009. Other languages chosen by Turkish students were German (five per cent), French (four per cent) and Italian (2.5 per cent). The USA remains a popular destination choice (up one percentage point to 22 per cent) while Malta also gained in popularity slightly, attracting five per cent of agency clients this year. Meanwhile, Spain topped the list of non-English speaking destinations with 2.5 per cent.

Student and course trends
Seventy-three per cent of students were undertaking a language programme this year, compared with 62 per cent previously. This meant that fewer students were undertaking work and travel programmes (six per cent down from 18 per cent), higher education programmes (seven per cent down from nine per cent and internships (one per cent down from four per cent). This year, the most popular reason for undertaking studies overseas was for future work purposes (61 per cent compared with 48 per cent previously) while the percentage of students intending to go on to further studies overseas fell from 20 per cent to just 14 per cent. These trends perhaps reflect the difficult economic climate of the last 12 months, which has made students consolidate their plans towards shorter language programmes rather than expensive university courses.

Agency business
Turkish students primarily use word-of-mouth to find their agency, according to this survey, with 50 per cent of them using this method and a further 22 per cent using the Internet. In the last 12 months, Turkish agents actively worked with 39 different providers, despite having relationships with an average of 201 schools each. Agencies found new schools to work with by a variety of methods that were fairly evenly divided in popularity. Workshops accounted for 25 per cent of partnerships, while the Internet and fairs and expos accounted for a further 24 per cent each.

Looking ahead
Agents gave mixed views regarding the immediate future of their businesses. Some declared that the economy was improving and that the decline in instances of swine flu worldwide would have a positive effect. Others, meanwhile, feared economic difficulties could still make travel problematic.


Economic overview

• In the second quarter of 2009, Turkey’s economy saw a rapid recovery, largely due to the tax incentives that increased consumption expenditures. However, the rest of the year saw a slow down in this growth due to high unemployment levels.

• Sharp contraction in total demand and harsh decline in commodity prices led to a rapid decline in Turkey’s inflation rates in 2009 and core inflation indicators are expected to remain at low levels.

• The main risks to financial stability in Turkey are anticipated as the economic recovery being slower than expected, leading to high unemployment rates, and possible new shocks that might be experienced in the global financial markets.

Source: Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey


Turkish agents named a range of language programmes they work with, including, in Australia: Sarina Russo, Brisbane, QLD. In Canada: Canadian as a Second Language Institute, Vancouver, BC; Global Village, various; International Language Schools of Canada, various; King George International College, various. In the UK: Anglo Continental, Bournemouth; Bournemouth Business School International, Bournemouth; Beet Language Centre, Bournemouth; Bell International, various; Bloomsbury, London; British Study Centres, London; Cambridge Education Group, Cambridge; EC, London; ETC International College, Bournemouth; Eurocentres, various; Exsportise, Haywards Heath; Hampstead School of English, London; Internexus, London; Kings College, various; Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool; Language Studies International, London; Melton College, York; Moira House International Summer School, Eastbourne; Regent, various; University of Hertfordshire, London; UIC, London; Westbourne Academy, Bournemouth. In the USA: ELS Language Centers, various. Worldwide: Embassy CES; Kaplan Aspect; Sprachcaffe; St Giles.

Thank you to the following agencies for taking part in this survey: Anatolia, Can.be International Counselling and Tourism Company, Desk Abroad Education Consultancy, Easy Education, End International Education, Global Training, Education and Consultancy, Hamle Consultancy & International Trade Study Abroad, Idealist Education Consultancy, IdilLinsan, Monat International Education Consulting, Pasifik International Education Consultancy, Setur Servis Turistic, Teorem International Education Consultancy, Truva, Turkuaz International Education Consultancy, UKLA Abroad, Westedu International Education Consultancy.

Contact any advertiser in the this issue now

The following language schools, associations and accommodation providers advertised in the latest edition of Language Travel Magazine. If you would like more information on any of these advertisers, tick the relevant boxes, fill out your details and send.

Name

Company
Country

Telephone

Email


ACCOMMODATION
Britannia Student
      Services  
Nido Student Living  

ASSOCIATIONS/GROUPS
English Australia  
Feltom Malta  
International House
      World Organisation  
NEAS Australia  
Quality English  

EVENTS
Alphe Conferences  
WYSTC  

EXAM BOARDS
Cambridge Esol  
IELTS  

GUARDIANSHIP
COMPANIES
Brightworld
      Guardianships  

INSURANCE
PROVIDERS
Dr. Walter GmbH  

SERVICES
InTouch  
LTM Star Awards  

TOURIST BOARDS
Malta Tourism
     Authority  

ARGENTINA
Ecela - Latin
      Immersion  

AUSTRALIA
Bond University  
Carrick Institute
      of Education  
International
      House Sydney  
La Trobe University  
Language Studies
      International  
Pacific Gateway   
      International College  
Shafston
      International College
Universal English
      College
      (Global Village
      Sydney)  
University of
      Tasmania  
University of
      Western Australia  
University of
      Western Sydney
      College  

CANADA
International
      House Toronto &
      Calgary  

CHINA
China study
      Abroad  
IH Xi'an  
iMandarin
      Language
      Training Institute  

ENGLAND
International
      House Newcastle  
Kaplan Aspect  
      (Australia, Canada,
      Ireland, Malta, New
      Zealand, South
      Africa, UK, USA)
LAL Language
      and Leisure  
      (Canada, Cyprus,
      Ireland, England,
      South Africa, Spain,
      Switzerland, USA)
Malvern House
      College London  
Kings Colleges
      (Prime Education)  
Spinnaker College  
St Giles Colleges
      (Canada, UK, USA) 
Study Group  
      (Australia, Canada,
      England, France,
      Germany, Ireland,
      Italy, New Zealand,
      South Africa, Spain,
      USA)
Thames Valley
      Summer Schools  
Queen Ethelburga's
      College  
Twin Group  
      (Ireland, UK)
University of
      Essex -
      International
      Academy  
Wickham Court
      School  

FRANCE
International
      House Nice  

GERMANY
International House
      Berlin - Prolog  

HONG KONG
Q Language Ltd  

IRELAND
Alpha College of
      English  
Galway Language
      Centre  
MEI Ireland  
University of
      Limerick  

ITALY
International
      House Palermo  

JAPAN
Tamagawa
      International
      Language School  

MALTA
Clubclass
      Residential
      Language School  
Feltom Malta  
inlingua Malta  
International House
      Malta-Gozo  

NEW ZEALAND
Dominion English
      Schools  

SPAIN
International House
      Cadiz  
International House
      Corboba  
International House
       Madrid  
International House
      Sevilla - CLIC  
International House
      Valencia  
Malaca Instituto -
      Club Hispanico SL  
Pamplona Leraning
      Spanish Institute; 

SWITZERLAND
EF Language
      Colleges Ltd  
      (Australia, Canada,
      China, Costa Rica,
      Ecuador, England,
      France, Germany,
      Italy, Malta, New
      Zealand, Russia,
      Spain, Switzerland,
      USA)
Eurocentres
      International  
      (Australia, Canada,
      England, France,
      Germany, Italy,
      Japan, New Zealand,
      Russia, Spain,
      Switzerland, USA)

USA
IH New York  
Meritas LLC  
University of
      California San Diego  
Zoni Language
      Centers  
      (Canada, USA)



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